A Couple Hours in Virginia City

Virginia City, Nevada / Wooden Miner / April 26, 2014

Virginia City, Nevada / Wooden Miner / April 26, 2014

Virginia City, Nevada – April 26, 2014.

I’ve lived in Reno closing in on three years now and somehow had yet to make my way up the long and winding road up NV-341 to Virginia City, so when a friend suggested a trip up so she could check on a hotel, I was happy to tag along.

Getting to Virginia City is a good amount of fun, provided you have a car that can handle the climb up a single, winding road into the mountains, often right next to the edge of a very steep cliff. Blessedly, there are several “pull over” areas where slower traffic can allow impatient traffic to move on past. It’s a road that works better for the passenger (which I was) because you can spend your time looking out at the fantastic scenery instead of at the road in front of you. For the driver, I imagine it’s a fun enough trip, though every time you round a corner to see a decades-old pick-up truck hauling a too-large trailer downhill, it can’t be a good sight.

Virginia City itself is largely contained to one long street, full of museums, bars, hotels, trinket shops, and eateries. There’s still a wooden sidewalk in use for much of the street and I definitely recommend someone in your party wears boots to get the full CLOMP-CLOMP effect. We didn’t really get to see a whole lot (we got there too late to visit the Mark Twain Museum and weren’t hungry enough to stop and eat anywhere) but it was a nice walk up and down the street and I hope to get up there again before I move (I’m almost certainly leaving the area when my contract at UNR runs out in June).

Enjoy the images:

Virginia City / Presbyterian Church / April 26, 2014

Virginia City / Presbyterian Church / April 26, 2014

Virginia City / The sketchy history of animal rights in the west.

Virginia City / The sketchy history of animal rights in the west.

One of the literary greats and me: Marks Twain and Bousquet.

One of the literary greats and me: Marks Twain and Bousquet.

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